3 Ways to Become a Better Federal Proposal Writer

Six Strategies to Grow Your Business with the Treasury

Olessia Smotrova-Taylor, OST’s President and Chief Executive Officer, presented “Six Strategies to Grow Your Business with the Treasury” as a speaker at the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Small Business Outreach in May. More than a hundred of businesses, government representatives, and others attended the outreach event.

3 Ways to Become a Better Federal Proposal Writer

The Seven Deadly Proposal Sins, Part 5: Sloth

In our series covering the Seven Deadly Proposal Sins started last year, we have discussed the first four: Pride, Gluttony, Greed, and Envy. These covered the common mistakes and misconceptions we have come across throughout our work as business development consultants. Committing one or more of these sins is the surest way to waste resources Read More

3 Ways to Become a Better Federal Proposal Writer

How to capitalize on IDIQs

It seems that the tides have turned in the Government contracting world firmly in the direction of IDIQs and GSA/VA schedules. If you are the Government, it is hard to imagine why it would not be the case. Instead of a lengthy 12-18 months procurement process, the Government can award a contract in two to four months, reducing risk of protest. In addition, the budget approval and end of the fiscal year window shrinking, it is hard to imagine that anything will change any time soon.

3 Ways to Become a Better Federal Proposal Writer

Reminder and Olessia’s 5 tips for proposal professionals

I am in foggy San Jose in Silicon Valley, teaching a course for Stevens at NASA Ames. It is an intense, inquisitive, and exceedingly bright group of students. Some of their questions got me to remember some truths in the proposal profession that I began to take for granted – so I am sharing them with you after quickly jotting them down at 4 am (I am still on the East Coast time).

3 Ways to Become a Better Federal Proposal Writer

Rules of Thumb for Proposal Win Themes

Picture a daunted proposal evaluator who has yours and a pile of other proposals to read. Visualize hundreds of pages of boring technical text with sparse graphics, until lines turn into ants running through a page. What will this evaluator remember about your proposal by the time he or she reads the next proposal, and the next?